Maritime Safety Queensland's hydrographic survey vessel QG Norfolk was working in Rockhampton's Fitzroy River recently.
Maritime Safety Queensland's hydrographic survey vessel QG Norfolk was working in Rockhampton's Fitzroy River recently.

REVEALED: What lurks at the bottom of the Fitzroy

A SUNKEN yacht and a tinnie were two of the more interesting items found sitting on the bottom of the Fitzroy River recently.

Maritime Safety Queensland’s hydrographic survey vessel QG Norfolk (pictured) has just completed a survey of the river which discovered the wrecks at depths which “do not pose a risk.”

The Norfolk and tender vessel Tom Thumb work almost continuously along the Queensland coast and inland waterways.

This image of a sunken yacht on the bottom of the Fitzroy River was captured last month by Maritime Safety Queensland's hydrographic survey vessel,, QG Norfolk.
This image of a sunken yacht on the bottom of the Fitzroy River was captured last month by Maritime Safety Queensland's hydrographic survey vessel,, QG Norfolk.

They provide survey advice to assist with port and harbour management, under-keel clearance, dredging operations, navigational aid location and infrastructure development investigations.

Maritime Safety Queensland general manager Angus Mitchell said the Fitzroy River survey carried out in recent weeks was at the regional harbour master’s request and covered a section from the barrage to 10km downstream.

This image of a sunken tinnie on the bottom of the Fitzroy River was captured last month by Maritime Safety Queensland's hydrographic survey vessel, QG Norfolk.
This image of a sunken tinnie on the bottom of the Fitzroy River was captured last month by Maritime Safety Queensland's hydrographic survey vessel, QG Norfolk.

“The survey is to be used for navigational purposes and determining depths at the existing moorings,” Mr Mitchell said.

“A detailed report is still being prepared but the survey did identify some unusual objects including what appears to be a sunken yacht and a tinnie.

“Both wrecks are at depths which do not pose a risk.”

Mr Mitchell said the survey also identified significant natural movement of channels which would be incorporated in updated charts.

“Boaties should always remember rivers and coastal bars are dynamic environments,” he said.

“They should keep a proper lookout at all times, operate at safe speeds and wear life jackets whenever there is heightened risk.”

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