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Robot take-over: Our tech future in the palm of their hands

Luke Suly from Lakes Creek State School taking part in the Digital Roadshow Workshop which is touring the state introducing new technologies to students in regional Australia.
Luke Suly from Lakes Creek State School taking part in the Digital Roadshow Workshop which is touring the state introducing new technologies to students in regional Australia. Chris Ison ROK290817cdigital1

LUKE Suly was completely engrossed in building and programming robots to fight against each other like bumper cars when he was given an exciting vision into the future.

The school captain was one of a lucky number of Lakes Creek State School students who had the chanceto have hands-on time with cutting-edge technology as part of the Create Queensland Regional Roadshow yesterday.

"I was pretty interested before but now I'm more interested in this,” Luke said.

"I like the robots.”

He wasn't alone, as kids where champing at the bit to try every activity and use every piece of technology, from robots to touch screens.

IN CONTROL: Luke Suly from Lakes Creek State School takes part in the Create Queensland Regional Roadshow, which is touring the state introducing new technologies to students.
IN CONTROL: Luke Suly from Lakes Creek State School takes part in the Create Queensland Regional Roadshow, which is touring the state introducing new technologies to students. Chris Ison ROK290817cdigital2

The Create Queensland Regional Roadshow is a state-wide tour of primary schools, a collaboration between Active Entertainment and YouTube contracted by the Queensland Government.

The program's goal is to teach rural and Outback children about modern technology, such as robotics and computer programming, as well as giving them hands-on time with several fascinating and exciting tech toys.

The activities at Lakes Creek included using a virtual reality headset, steering a robot ball using an iPad with gyro motion controls, using a green screen to create scenes, an augmented reality program to learn about biology and, of course, the afore-mentioned battle bots.

Various workshops occurred across the day, including using claymation and computer effects to make movies, though unsurprisingly the robots proved the most popular.

"It can allow teachers to really get a glimpse of what this technology offers them across all the key learning areas,” an Education Queensland spokesperson said.

"We keep the kids constantly engaged throughout the day ... to really get them thinking.”

Despite all the screens and foreign technology, the event was a big hit with teachers as well as kids.

Lakes Creek State School students at the Digital Roadshow workshop.
Lakes Creek State School students at the Digital Roadshow workshop. Chris Ison ROK290817cdigital3

Year 5 and 6 teacher Cindy Smith declared the event a success.

"It's a big positive. A lot of these kids don't get the chance to do this at home,” Ms Smith said.

The educational benefits of using technology in the classroom went over in a big way.

"Because (the kids) don't think they are learning while they are doing it, they are having more fun,” she said.

"They are learning, they are learning the whole time.”

The Regional Roadshow is travelling to 62 schools across Queensland during semester two and is for primary school students in Years 3-6.



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