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Rockhampton's Indigenous mothers snubbed by vital program

Rockhampton has been passed over for a vital Indigenous health program for new and expectant mothers despite CQ's pregnancy rates far exceeding the national average.
Rockhampton has been passed over for a vital Indigenous health program for new and expectant mothers despite CQ's pregnancy rates far exceeding the national average. Patrick Gorbunovs

ROCKHAMPTON has been passed over for a vital Indigenous health program for new and expectant mothers despite CQ's pregnancy rates far exceeding the national average.

According to the Every Child CQ report, Rockhampton's rate of teen pregnancy is twice the national average - this is higher still for Indigenous women.

The expansion of the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) to 13 new sites was announced earlier this week by Federal Minster for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt.

The program, which supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) woman who are pregnant from 16 weeks gestation to two years, has had 1,269 enrolled mothers since it's inception in 2009.

It's purported the expansion sites for the ANFPP are determined by population health data including birth rates and maternal health needs of ATSI women, but the Department of Health had decided CQ isn't in need of the program despite the shocking pregnancy rate data.

The Department of Health was contacted for an explanation as to why Rockhampton has missed out on the program, but did not respond to any correspondence.

Topics:  aboriginal health indigenous mothers politics



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