Brodie in hospital after he copped a bull horn to the leg
Brodie in hospital after he copped a bull horn to the leg Contributed

Rocky boy Brodie, 17, cops bull horn through the calf

BULL fighting isn't for the faint hearted, it takes skill and a whole lot of courage, something 17-year-old Brodie Busby doesn't lack.

The Rockhampton local has been bull fighting for a year and a half and has seen his fair share of injuries.

Despite the massive risk of injuries that come with protecting bull riders from beasts, Brodie can't get enough.

He says it's the adrenaline rush that gets him back into the arena every time, with nothing quite comparing to being flicked by a bull.

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However it will be about five to six months before Brodie can tango with the bulls again, with an injury setting him back.

"Well this accident wasn't as bad as previous ones," Brodie began.

"But we were having a small practice day out at Alton Downs and one of the bulls was playing up not leaving the arena.

"So I went up to freestyle the bull for a bit and as I'd did a few rounds with him he decided to change leads."

 

RECOVERING: Brodie Busby, 17, of Rockhampton, suffered from an injury during a practise day
RECOVERING: Brodie Busby, 17, of Rockhampton, suffered from an injury during a practise day Allan Reinikka ROK291216abullrid

Brodie said he knew the bull was going to get him so he braced himself for the impact.

The bull knocked the 17-year-old down and stuck his horn straight through his calve muscle, leaving a 20cm by 13cm "gash" on his leg.

"The doc believes that it will take about 5-6 months before my leg will be fully functional again but hopefully I might be able to knock a month or two off that," Brodie said.

Keen to get back into the arena, Brodie first stepped onto the bullfighting scene just over a year ago.

He has always been around rodeo from a young age as his mum and dad were calf ropers.

"My grandad George Busby also breeds bucking horses here in Rocky and one weekend I was at a rodeo with him at the Great Western Hotel and saw a young fella named Jared Boghero bullfighting and for some reason had a desire to give it a shot," Brodie said.

"I suppose the adrenaline is one side of it that keeps you going back for more. There's no feeling that compares to getting flicked by a bull and there's nothing like being out in front of a packed crowd while the bulls are bucking and the crowd is going off, its really an indescribable feeling.

"My best mate Izayah Gilby and I travel to and from rodeos together and the ongoing mateship around rodeo is really what keeps us going back, it's just like one big family."

While Brodie says bullfighters keep their general fitness in check, it was more the mental side of things which needed to be in check.

"You've really got to prepare yourself mentally and keep a clear head but with the protection side of bullfighting it's not something you really prepare for because there's a million different scenarios that could occur so it's really a 'react to action' kind of thing."

Brodie says he hopes to be back in the arena as soon as possible and thanks to the support of his family and friends, he may get his wish.

"I thank my mother for her on going support because without her I would be where I am today," Brodie said.



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