Jeffrey John Ross, 44, pleaded guilty to supplying methamphetamines.
Jeffrey John Ross, 44, pleaded guilty to supplying methamphetamines. File

Ex-drug dealer to rebuild business

WHEN notorious drug dealer Jeffrey Ross gets out of jail next year he plans to rebuild his once reputable business empire.

At the height of his success Ross operated security screen businesses in Rockhampton, Gladstone and Mackay – until his drug habit derailed it.

The boss of CQ Screens’ severe addiction to “speed” consumed him and encouraged a “guest list of grubs” and a “who’s who of drug users” to enter his home and workplace.

Yesterday Ross, 44, took a positive step toward putting his drug dealing past behind him when he pleaded guilty in the Rockhampton Supreme Court to five counts of supplying methamphetamines.

It was the last of his outstanding criminal charges before the court.

Currently Ross is serving a sentence for grievous bodily harm after being convicted of orchestrating a home invasion.

After yesterday’s court appearance he will remain behind bars until November 25 next year after receiving a three-year prison term, with an early parole release.

Defence barrister David Murray SC said Ross’s drug problem spiralled out of control as a result of depression, overwork and other drug addicts taking advantage of him.

Ross started CQ Screens to follow in the footsteps of his father, who owned NT Screens in the Northern Territory.

As business took off, he planned to open up stores in every town across Central Queensland.

But things started crashing down when Ross started shooting up.

He would inject an “8 ball” a day (3.5g of speed).

Mr Murray said Ross was a quietly spoken man who had not set out to sell drugs.

The five counts of supplying methamphetamines relate to five drug transactions between September 1, 2005 and February 25, 2006.

For most of them he supplied 1g and received $300 back.

On the day his home was raided, February 25, a police officer asked Ross why he got his reputable business involved in drugs.

His reply was simple: “I wanted to get more friends”.

Police did not have sufficient evidence to show the quantity of drugs traded, or how much profit he made.

But what was clear was that he was “street dealing” for a solid five months. Mr Murray said Ross had a lot to look forward to when he got out of prison.

Not only did he have big plans for a new screens business, but he had a two-year-old daughter he was dying to spend time with during her young childhood.



Anzac gunfire captured in stunning photograph

Anzac gunfire captured in stunning photograph

'The most amazing Anzac image that has ever been taken in Australia'

CQ community hero lives on in park naming

premium_icon CQ community hero lives on in park naming

'It didn't matter what time...if they got a call... he was there'

'Mayhem on the water' as boaties dodge craft in tight area

premium_icon 'Mayhem on the water' as boaties dodge craft in tight area

Extra car parks no solution to Yeppoon ramp congestion

Local Partners