Young doctors are being encouraged to complete their training in rural communities to further their skills. Photo: file
Young doctors are being encouraged to complete their training in rural communities to further their skills. Photo: file

Rural communities to welcome 50 new junior doctors

A new cohort of interns and resident medical officers are being encouraged to spend time training in rural communities to develop their skills.

Rural Doctors Association of Australia will call for an increase in the number of Commonwealth supported training positions this year as part of the Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund (RJDTIF).

“We are excited that this year the RJDTIF will have an additional 50 places for junior doctors to experience a supported placement in a rural setting,” RDAA President-Elect Dr Megan Belot said.

“We will be calling for a significant expansion of this program in the 2021 Budget so that even more doctors will be able to take up this great opportunity.

“This will be as part of our broader rural medical workforce strategy proposal which is aimed at providing significant improvements and streamlining of the programs and supports available for rural medical training and careers.”

Dr Belot said working in a regional setting provided many benefits for young doctors, regardless of what area they hoped to specialise in.

“No matter what area of medicine you end up in, or where you end up practising, spending some time in rural medicine will make you a better doctor,” she said.

“For some it helps to gain a better understanding of the challenges faced by rural patients when they are referred on to city specialists or care.

“For others they will leave with a better understanding of both the limitations on doctors practising in the bush, as well as their exceptional skills and clinical ability.

“And for others they will find their calling in the truly rewarding, interesting, challenging and ever-changing practice of rural medicine, as well as the joys of living in a rural community.”

Regional community members are encouraged to support and welcome the training doctors.

“Make them feel welcome and help support them to have a positive experience,” Dr Belot said.

“These doctors are the future medical workforce and we want them to choose the fantastic career that rural medicine can offer.”



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