PLANNING AHEAD: Capricorn Edible Plant’s Stewart Harley Weston at Yeppoon Show.
PLANNING AHEAD: Capricorn Edible Plant’s Stewart Harley Weston at Yeppoon Show.

Show contributors sew, grow and create

THE much-anticipated Yeppoon and District Agricultural Show may have been cancelled for June 6-7, but regular exhibition contributors are determined to continue to grow, sew and create in a bid to ensure next year’s show will be bigger and better than ever before.

Yeppoon Show President Ken Landsberg said everyone is disappointed there will be no show this year but in the interest of public safety, it was the right call to make.

“Many people look forward to displaying their goods at show time and the community love to come along to the various pavilions and view the exhibitions so it is a shame we will all miss out this year but it just means we will all be very excited when show time comes around again in 2021,” Mr Landsberg said.

Known for his oversized pumpkins, commercial small farmer Keith Stocks said his family business will keep doing what they do best and when show time comes around again, he will be ready.

“Each year aside from our normal operations and planting for our farm, we plan well ahead for what we will plant for the Yeppoon, and Caves Agricultural shows,” Mr Stocks said.

“We have to think ahead, decide where to get our seed from and are always looking for opportunities to present a slightly different display each year.

“We are a small operation, so we have to think outside the square.

“We normally grow between 20-30 different varieties of pumpkin for the shows which involves a lot of research, browsing seed and gardening catalogues.”

Mr Stocks said the large pumpkins are always popular and with several varieties now available it is always a careful decision on what they will plant.

“Getting it right is the trick, it all comes down to how you care for the plant and is dependent on the weather and what nature brings,” he said.

“Some people play music and talk to their crop, it really is a lot to do with how you fertilise, and in our climate, it is important to keep them in the shade.

“It looks easy but there is a lot of attention that goes into their care, knowledge and some downright luck.

“We do a lot of planning ahead; it takes about 120 days from planting seed to harvest and anything can happen in between.”

Mr Stocks said he looks forward to supporting the Yeppoon Show next year as he has done for the past 40 years.



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