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Silence a tad deafening for Supermum's during holidays

IF YOU are getting me food, great, otherwise, can you please be quiet?"

As I heard a little voice utter those words while I was digging through the fridge just over a week ago I could only shake my head.

Talk about the pot calling the kettle black.

Can you please be quiet?

That is a statement I have uttered more times than I care to remember since the birth of my son 11 years ago, and now it was being echoed back.

One thing I have learned in those 11 years is boys really can be noisy.

No matter the activity it was always with added sound effects.

In fact, it was in times of quiet that I knew to be very suspicious.

Then I would find my child doing something (or eating something) he shouldn't.

Like other mums, I have adjusted to the added noise in order to stay sane. Well, as sane as any mother.

I stopped watching live television, recording my favourite shows and watching them in the rare times I was guaranteed quiet. You know, the times when the kids are asleep or not home.

Harry Bruce Supermum July 3
Harry Bruce Supermum July 3

I learned to tune out the background noise so it hardly became noticeable.

In times where that seemed impossible I followed the "if can't beat them, join them" theory, so I would turn some music on and play it louder.

This week however, the silence in the house is noticeable.

As my son spends the school holidays at my parent's property, I am enjoying a touch of serenity.

There have been no important questions being asked while I am in the middle of a shower.

No repetitive questions of what there is to eat because he is hungry.

I have even watched some television shows while they are actually on TV (although I miss that I can't fast forward the commercials).

There has been no sharing of bodily functions, his new favourite noise making activity, as boys do.

And there have been no more demands for me to keep quiet.

I know by the end of next week I will crave the return of noise at home but for now I will enjoy the silence.

I just never realised before how loud silence was.

Topics:  school holidays silence supermum



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