Aurora australis over Davis Station, Antarctica. Picture: Barend Becker
Aurora australis over Davis Station, Antarctica. Picture: Barend Becker

Breathtaking weather caught on film

AUSTRALIA is often recognised for its colourful and spectacular landscapes, but it's also home to some pretty incredible weather patterns. If you've ever experienced a storm in the Northern Territory, witnessed lightening flashing across the Kimberley or simply been caught in a shock downpour in Sydney, you'll know just how breathtaking these seemingly ordinary acts of Mother Nature can be.

And now the Bureau of Meteorology has collected images of these phenomenal natural events and printed the very best of them in its 2018 Australian Weather Calendar.

A cold front brings powerful waves to Mornington Pier, Victoria. Picture: Jennifer Erlandsen
A cold front brings powerful waves to Mornington Pier, Victoria. Picture: Jennifer Erlandsen

The calendar, published jointly by the Bureau and the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society, features 13 magnificent images that have been submitted by photographers from across the country.

Changing skies above Capital Wind Farm near Bungendore, New South Wales Picture: Seenivasan Kumaravel
Changing skies above Capital Wind Farm near Bungendore, New South Wales Picture: Seenivasan Kumaravel

Each image is coupled with a simple explanation of the weather event that is pictured.

The dramatic selection of shots include a firey sunset at Mount Hotham in Victoria, a vibrant lightening strike over the Mount Isa mines in Queensland, and the rainbow hues of a storm cell as it hangs over West MacDonnell Ranges in the Northern Territory.

Lightning strikes over Mount Isa mines, Queensland. Picture: Grant Szabadics
Lightning strikes over Mount Isa mines, Queensland. Picture: Grant Szabadics

Then there's a hypnotising photo of a full moon alongside the planet Mars glowing brightly through clouds over Kosciuszko National Park. What makes the image even more striking is the reflection of both the sky and rocks in the glasslike water in the foreground. This particular shot, by photographer Luke Tscharke, has been chosen as the calendar's cover image.

This year's cover image features a full moon alongside the planet Mars shining through cirrostratus clouds over Kosciuszko National Park. Picture: Luke Tscharke
This year's cover image features a full moon alongside the planet Mars shining through cirrostratus clouds over Kosciuszko National Park. Picture: Luke Tscharke

CEO and Director of Meteorology Dr. Andrew Johnson said he is excited about this year's calendar.

A path through the clouds between Townsville and Richmond, Queensland. Picture: Captain Victoria Harrison
A path through the clouds between Townsville and Richmond, Queensland. Picture: Captain Victoria Harrison

"Every year the Australian Weather Calendar stands out due to its exceptional quality and detail

with every image accompanied by a scientific explanation of the phenomena featured.

Lightning over Lake Argyle in the Kimberley, Western Australia. Picture: Ben Broady
Lightning over Lake Argyle in the Kimberley, Western Australia. Picture: Ben Broady

"This year's calendar also highlights the Bureau's focus on delivering impact and value for all

Aurora australis over Davis Station, Antarctica. Picture: Barend Beckerb
Aurora australis over Davis Station, Antarctica. Picture: Barend Beckerb

Australians and driving excellence in everything we do for the community, businesses and the

environment," he said.

Storms over the Exercise KAKADU fleet off the Northern Territory coast. Picture: ABIS Kayla Hayes
Storms over the Exercise KAKADU fleet off the Northern Territory coast. Picture: ABIS Kayla Hayes

According to the Bureau of Meteorology's website, the calendar also includes the monthly weather conditions for 12 major cities - including average temperatures and rainfall.

Storm cell seen across the West MacDonnell Ranges, Northern Territory. Picture: Peter Nunn
Storm cell seen across the West MacDonnell Ranges, Northern Territory. Picture: Peter Nunn

The calendar is available for purchase at the Bureau of Meteorology's online shop (shop.bom.gov.au) and selected Bureau offices. You can also call 1300 798 789 to place an order. The calendar comes in two sizes - large and small. Prices start at $14 (excluding postage and handling).



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