Brianna Richards, 9, points out where a car lost control on Stenlake Avenue, with other concerned residents Inida Belz, 13, Roseann Ireland, 14, Cr Stephen Schwarten, Charlie Belz, Sameeka Richards, 2, Sonya Richards, Kiana Belz, 11 and Alexandra Richards, 12.
Brianna Richards, 9, points out where a car lost control on Stenlake Avenue, with other concerned residents Inida Belz, 13, Roseann Ireland, 14, Cr Stephen Schwarten, Charlie Belz, Sameeka Richards, 2, Sonya Richards, Kiana Belz, 11 and Alexandra Richards, 12. Sharyn Oneill

Street lines up to fight hoons

CHARLIE Belz can’t take it any more.

And neither can 53 of his Stenlake Avenue neighbours.

After watching a speeding hoon almost kill his wife as she walked along the footpath cradling their four-month-old daughter in her arms and holding the hand of their other daughter, he is leading a campaign to prevent a tragedy.

“Someone’s going to be killed. I almost lost my whole family because of some idiot,” he said yesterday as he described how a car wrapped itself around a power pole and almost split it in half last week.

The crash happened just metres from the front yard his children play in.

And after hearing Charlie’s family’s close call, Cr Stephen Schwarten said he is 100% behind the neighbourhood’s petition to Rockhampton Regional Council.

It is only one of 10 accidents Charlie has witnessed in the seven years he has lived there, with the incident involving his family taking place several years ago.

“I’ve asked council repeatedly to put in speed bumps,” Charlie said.

“But I’ve never even received one return phone call.”

Cr Schwarten said, by law, council must spend money constructing chicanes or speed bumps in new estates to slow drivers down, so they should also be fixing problems that already exist.

“It’s going to be a long and hard campaign and they’re going to say there’s no money, but we’ve just got to keep pushing them,” he said.

“Someone really is going to be killed.”

Council said the cost for any additional works, such as speed humps, would ultimately be borne by the region’s ratepayers.

Charlie said he and his neighbour’s had written letters to council begging them to “spend some of our rates money before it’s too late”.

“We’ve been thinking of selling up because of what’s happening,” Charlie said. “But I’d never forgive myself if I did and a child died.”



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