A supplied image obtained on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 of musician Peter Garrett, lead singer of the band Midnight Oil and his band members performing in Alice Springs during the band's first official show of their
A supplied image obtained on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 of musician Peter Garrett, lead singer of the band Midnight Oil and his band members performing in Alice Springs during the band's first official show of their "Great Circle Tour" held at Anzac Oval. (AAP Image/Jones PR) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY Oliver Eclipse

The Oils bring a burning desire to Rocky

MIDNIGHT Oil have thrown their weight behind the plight of Australia's greatest natural wonder, The Great Barrier Reef.

Playing to an intimate crowd at the Tank Arts Centre in Cairns on Friday, the band is donating all proceeds from the special benefit show to Great Barrier Reef Legacy and the Australian Marine Conservation Society.

Great Barrier Reef Legacy will use the much-needed funds towards a three-week research expedition to the most northern reaches of the reef in the search for 'super corals' capable of withstanding rising sea temperatures.

The seminal rock band is back on home soil for the final leg of The Great Circle World Tour, which continues at the Great Western Hotel in Rockhampton on Thursday.

While the reef benefit show featured a special, one-off set of protest songs chosen for the band's latest cause, fans attending the Rockhampton show can expect to hear a similar message.

Front man Peter Garrett was particularly vocal with his onstage comments on Friday about the devastating potential environmental impact of the Adani Coal mine.

He noted that reef tourism creates sustainable jobs in greater numbers than largely automated coal mines and does so without needing to divert a billion dollars of taxpayers' money to an overseas corporation with a dubious track record. 

"It's one thing to talk about this stuff and it's another to do something," he said.

There were also references to Mr Abbott and Mrs Hanson, who want to 'pull our country back into the dark ages', and the need for more renewable power.

"Some of us have been talking about renewable energy for a long time," Garrett said.

"(It will create) lots of new jobs and it's not bad for anybody."

Politics aside, the five-piece was in top form at their Cairns show. Touring for the first time in more than a decade, the band has as much energy as ever. Garrett, 64, commanded the stage, using his signature dance style to interpret every guitar riff and melody.  

While Thursday's show is sold out, fans will get the chance to watch Midnight Oil's reef benefit show on Foxtel's MAX channel in the coming weeks.

 



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