The technology that could stop car thieves in their tracks

 

Fingerprint technology could be deployed in cars to stop criminals stealing vehicles, under a proposal by the RACQ for the state government to investigate "user unique" identifier technology.

The peak motoring body made the recommendation to a parliamentary inquiry investigating engine immobilisers - set up by the government as part of its response to dealing with youth crime in the state.

In its submission, the RACQ suggested the government investigate other security technologies that offer identifying technologies that are unique to the users of a vehicle, such as fingerprint recognition.

They said an investigation would determine whether the technology could be "cost effectively" applied to vehicles across the state.

The RACQ has also recommended that the government consider what action could be taken to address "the issue of key security".

The RACQ has recommended that the government consider what action could be taken to address “the issue of key security”.
The RACQ has recommended that the government consider what action could be taken to address “the issue of key security”.

RACQ Principal Technical Researcher Russell Manning said stolen keys were estimated to be behind 70 per cent of vehicle thefts.

"Security of keys is very important, is not reliant on new technology and is low costs," Mr Manning said.

"We would encourage the government to look further into educating people about the importance of key security.

"After that, technology that incorporates a personal identifier could be investigated.

"This could include technologies like key pads, PINs and fingerprint recognition for example which would be fitted to vehicles.

"This would provide a second line of defence, but would add cost and may be inconvenient to drivers."

Another recommendation put forward by RACQ was to introduce and fund diversionary programs for recidivist offenders.

Their report acknowledged that while technology existed to remotely immobilise vehicles, very few manufacturers chose to incorporate it in their vehicles.

They also pointed out that a large portion of Queensland vehicles built since July, 2001 are already required to have an engine immobiliser to comply with Australian Design Rules.

They recommended that an investigation be held to determine if it would be cost effective to amend the design rule to widen it to more vehicles to "reduce the potential theft pool".

Originally published as The technology that could stop car thieves in their tracks



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