Cameron Nicholls, of Nicholls & Co Estate Agents, hires for attitude and trains for skill. Picture: Danny Aarons
Cameron Nicholls, of Nicholls & Co Estate Agents, hires for attitude and trains for skill. Picture: Danny Aarons

535,600 jobs, no degree required

MORE than half a million new jobs are in the pipeline that do not require a university degree.

Projections from the Jobs and Small Business department show in the five years to May, 2022, 412,700 new jobs will require a bachelor or higher - but 535,600 others will not.

Of these, about 314,200 are expected to require a certificate II to IV and 129,000 a diploma or advanced diploma.

Some jobs with a strong job outlook and no university degree needed include:

ELECTRICIAN

About 11,000 more electricians are expected to be needed, increasing its workforce by 6.9 per cent.

More than two-thirds hold a certificate III or IV qualification. Only about one in 100 have a bachelor degree.

The average salary is $68,499, PayScale reports.

CHEF

Another 10,900 chefs are forecast to be hired in the next five years, causing its workforce to jump 12.1 per cent.

About 45 per cent of chefs hold a certificate III or IV. Only one in 10 have a university qualification.

PayScale reports kitchen chefs earn on average $48,574 while executive chefs average $77,817.

There are hoardes of jobs for chefs and no need to get a degree to work as one. Picture: iStock
There are hoardes of jobs for chefs and no need to get a degree to work as one. Picture: iStock

ICT SUPPORT TECHNICIAN

An 11 per cent job growth is expected by 2022, with 5900 more roles to be created.

About half of workers in this field have a vocational qualification, such as a diploma, or have landed a job straight out of high school.

Generally, employers in information and communications technology are more interested in the practical skills a candidate can demonstrate than their formal qualifications.

PayScale reports the average salary is $50,480.

EDUCATION AIDE

About 21,900 new education aides are forecast to be needed across Australia by 2022, increasing its workforce by 23.6 per cent.

About a third of workers in this field have a certificate III or IV while more than a quarter have no post-school qualification.

The average salary of a full-time education aide is $927 a week or about $48,000 a year.

REAL ESTATE SALES AGENT

An extra 7800 real estate salespeople are forecast to be needed, representing an 8.7 per cent increase.

While a quarter of the workforce in 2015 had a bachelor degree, this is not a requirement.

PayScale reports the average real estate agent earns $47,684 but this varies greatly depending on commissions, which typically grow alongside experience and professional networks.

Cameron Nicholls, principal of Nicholls & Co Estate Agents, didn’t go to university and has no regrets. Picture: Danny Aarons
Cameron Nicholls, principal of Nicholls & Co Estate Agents, didn’t go to university and has no regrets. Picture: Danny Aarons

Nicholls and Co Estate Agents principal Cameron Nicholls says he hires for attitude and trains for skill, and does not care if an applicant has been to university.

"The resume is important but I don't care if you've got five degrees if your attitude stinks, that's not in line with my values," he says.

Nicholls himself did not go to university but completed vocational training to become a licensed agent.

He started his career as a receptionist at an agency and, after seven years learning the ropes, opened his own business.

"At age 27, I started the business in the second bedroom of my apartment where I live with my wife," he says.

"Three years later, we now have a team of four and have an office shop front and have picked up a few awards along the way.

"I am quite averse to doing formal training but I have a terrific support network and mentors that have the experience and years under their belt."



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