Trial of alleged murderer Stanley Stanley hears from doctors

A JURY has heard the victim of an alleged murder had a blood alcohol reading of 0.185 around the time of the attack, which could have lessened the force required to inflict the injuries he sustained.

The trial of Stanley Stanley Junior continued in the Supreme Court at Rockhampton yesterday.

Stanley, 44, was charged with one count of murder after he allegedly stomped on Alan Robert Mitchell's head while he was unconscious on the floor of a friend's Koongal house in April 2013.

Mr Mitchell, 59, later died of brain injuries in hospital.

The court heard from the forensic pathologist who carried out the autopsy on Mr Mitchell, Dr Nadine Forde, who said the injuries he sustained would generally require "a severe degree of force" to be inflicted.

But she agreed with defence barrister James Godbolt's suggestion that it may only take moderate force to inflict the same injuries given other circumstances, including Mr Mitchell's blood alcohol content.

The court also heard there was no distinct pattern or impressions on Mr Mitchell's face from the steel-capped boots allegedly used in the attack.

Detective Sergeant Scott Ingram was later called to give evidence, where he confirmed Stanley's blood alcohol content was not taken until hours after he was in custody.

He confirmed Mr Mitchell was known to police and had an outstanding drug-related matter at the time of the incident.

The trial continues today.



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