The RACQ Capricorn Rescue Helicopter landing at Mount Archer school to launch the 'Streets Ahead' program. School captains Caylis Lewis, Tyrelle Pope, Storm Duke and Ellie Bloomfield with Cr Neil Fisher.
The RACQ Capricorn Rescue Helicopter landing at Mount Archer school to launch the 'Streets Ahead' program. School captains Caylis Lewis, Tyrelle Pope, Storm Duke and Ellie Bloomfield with Cr Neil Fisher. Allan Reinikka ROK220517achopper

Watch: RACQ rams home road safety message

THEY'RE years away from getting behind the wheel themselves but it is never too early to learn about road safety.

RACQ launched their 'Streets Ahead' program yesterday to the wide-eyed students at Mt Archer State School.

In conjunction with the RACQ Capricorn Helicopter Rescue Service, the students were taught the basics of road safety and heard from pilots directly.

In the last five years, 65 children have lost their lives on the state's roads, with 20% coming in Central Queensland.

RACQ's head of community and education David Contarini said enough was enough.

"It is very important we teach the basics of road safety to these students, they are young and don't fully understand the ramifications that can happen,” David said.

"They don't yet have the peripheral vision or thought process to know the dangers around.

"Today we will concentrate on teaching the students how to be a better passenger in a motor vehicle, to be a better cyclist and how to be a better pedestrian around the roads in Rockhampton.

"Kids can watch out on the roads they are walking and riding on. Things like stop, look, listen and think before they cross the road and also things like ensuring they wear protective gear like helmets where possible.”

The RACQ Capricorn Rescue Helicopter landing at Mount Archer school to launch the 'Streets Ahead' program. David Contarini.
The RACQ Capricorn Rescue Helicopter landing at Mount Archer school to launch the 'Streets Ahead' program. David Contarini. Allan Reinikka ROK220517achopper

David encouraged parents to do their little bit extra to fasten the message.

"We can all do better to provide education for our students and it is important we teach it at a young age,” he said.

"It is vital for parents to model good behaviour, make sure they stick to the speed limit, make sure they wear seat belts and make sure there are as little distractions as possible.”

For the hundreds of students, the roar of the helicopter's arrival and the gusts of wind that blew their hats off, was the biggest thrill.

After striving to be the first to see the helicopter, they were able to see it up close and ask questions of the pilots.

School captains Tyrelle Pope and Storm Duke were surprised at the shear size of the helicopter.

"Once we saw it in the air we thought it would be small but up close it is quite big and a lot louder than we thought,” Tyrelle said.

"We saw bits of grass shooting at us and the winds were really strong.”

"We would normally be in class, but this is better,” Storm said.

"The helicopter can go to places that ambulances and cars can't go and they save people. It was really cool to see it land on our oval and see it up close.”



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