BOOK LOVERS: Woorabinda State School students (L-R) Kikki-Lee McInnerney; Ally Williams; Paul Neal and Gurung Tobane
BOOK LOVERS: Woorabinda State School students (L-R) Kikki-Lee McInnerney; Ally Williams; Paul Neal and Gurung Tobane Contributed

Woorabinda's young book lovers enjoy literary boost

AN eye-watering $10,000 in books has been donated to Woorabinda State School.

The book-loving students from k-6 received more than 550 books selected by the students as part of a wish-list of their favourite reads.

Among those were beloved classics from Roald Dahl and Dr Seuss, books from Australian authors like Rod Clement and Graeme Base, and contemporary fiction from Morris Gleitzman and Jackie French.

The school also requested reference books and class sets.

Under Dymocks Children's Charities (DCC) Library Regeneration program, grant funding from the Iwasaki Foundation Community provided a donation of $5000.

DCC doubled the generous offer with another $5,000 contribution of its own.

DCC's general manager, Paul Swain, said there was a strong correlation between school library budgets and literacy levels in Australia and in libraries worldwide.

"Unfortunately research shows that most Australian school library budgets have either remained unchanged or declined in recent years," Mr Swain said.

"This means that old books aren't being replaced and children don't have access to new releases which keep them motivated as readers.

"Children who engage with a wide range of quality books from an early age have much better literacy outcomes."

The aim of the Library Regeneration program is designed to help improve students' literary skills and promote daily reading for pleasure.

The school's principal, Tracey Egan, said the books had piqued the interest in reading among her students and had helped regenerate their library.

"Our library burned down about five years ago... so these books have really put the library back on its feet," Ms Egan said.

Ms Egan said the books would be used across the school as part of a change in the curriculum.

"These texts are going to form the core of our literacy component... it's a very big contribution," she said.

"We selected a range of texts for the way children approach themselves in the world - their home, their family, their community, state and country, indigenous communities, out to a global context."



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