FASCINATING FIND: A section of the hull of a shipwreck thought to date back to the late 1800s found at Sandy Point, north of Rockhampton. Investigations into its history are ongoing.
FASCINATING FIND: A section of the hull of a shipwreck thought to date back to the late 1800s found at Sandy Point, north of Rockhampton. Investigations into its history are ongoing. Carl Porter.

Wrecked ship's insurance had lapsed just weeks earlier

THREE weeks before it ran aground near Yeppoon, the ketch Violet's insurance lapsed.

The 37-tonne ship, built in New South Wales in 1877, had left Mackay on February 16 bound for Bundaberg.

It's the wreck of this ship which is thought to have been uncovered at Sandy Point recently.

The Morning Bulletin reported on an inquiry into the boat's fate, which was held by Harbour Master Captain Sykes on February 29.

The ship's master was CW Hine, a position he had held since May 24, 1891.

During the ketch Violet's last voyage, it hit bad weather south of Cape Townshend on February 22, which worsened as the ship made its way down the coast.

The inquiry was told the vessel struck the sand about 12.15am on February 24, with The Morning Bulletin reporting "she bumped very heavily”.

"Witness remained on board till 1.30am, and then put the boat in the water but it filled,” the article stated.

"The sea was breaking right over the vessel, which was broadside on.

"They bailed out the boat, and with tackles on to steady her they landed with their effects.

"They tried to get back to the vessel for rations, but could not do so.

"They landed and pulled the boat up after them.

"At daylight the rain cleared off and he saw he was on the beach half a mile south of Corio Creek.”

The vessel and its contents were not insured.

"The sea struck right over the vessel after she grounded,” The Morning Bulletin reported.

"When he abandoned the vessel, her back was broken and she was about half full of water.

"The masts were still standing but he considered the Violet was a total wreck; all the planking on the port side was away from the frames.”

Able seaman John Jones also gave evidence at the inquiry.

He had worked three years on the Violet and told the inquiry the master "was attentive and sober, and handled the vessel well”.

"He did not think anyone could have done more towards saving the vessel than was done,” The Morning Bulletin said.

After evidence from a second seaman, the inquiry concluded.



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